FAQs About That 7 OT Hockey Game…

Cleveland St. Ignatius and Sylvania Northview boys hockey played to a 1-1 tie in a seven overtime championship game Saturday night. That’s raised some questions, and here are the answers:

Seven overtimes? That’s got to be the record, right?

-Nope. In 1955 Minneapolis South beat Thief River Falls 3-2 in eleven overtimes. In fact, this wasn’t even the longest game in Ohio history, because in February 2007 Solon took Aurora to eight OTs before winning 2-1. This was the longest OHSAA title game, however.

Who made the decision to end the game?

-According to an OHSAA statement, it was the “head coaches, school administrators and OHSAA administrators.”

Why didn’t they postpone any additional overtimes to another time?

-According to Mark Monroe, who did yeoman’s work covering the game for the Toledo Blade, they considered this option and ruled it out. Why?

OHSAA spokesman Tim Stried points out that both teams were from out of town. “Asking them and their fans to get hotel rooms or drive back and forth would have resulted in quite a backlash, too, as none of them would have been prepared to stay overnight.” Plus, Nationwide Arena wasn’t available today.

Oh, and Mark and Tim? I certainly hope you get paid overtime for your work.

Why didn’t they just hold a shootout?

-National rules prohibit it.

Well, they just ignored the rules by ending the game when they did. Why couldn’t they just ignore the rule about shootouts?

-The very premise of that question is flawed. There have always been policies in place that allowed games to be called for reasons of player safety or sportsmanship.

If it’s always been the policy, give me one more example of when this happened?

-All right. In 2008 Michigan’s DI title game was called after 109 minutes and eight overtimes. The score of that contest between Marquette and Orchard Lake St. Mary was also 1-1.

So how long is a high school overtime?

-It’s eight minutes.

This entry was posted in Hockey and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s