When Refs Attack

So here’s something you don’t see every day. In the fourth quarter of last night’s Nets/Raptors game, a referee tried to block Kris Humphries’ free throw!


Now it’s clear the official was trying to get a substitute in the game, Humphries eventually made the shot and Brooklyn would go on to win 94-88.

So–ahem–no harm, no foul, right?

Anyway, rather than allow this referee to be the subject of ridicule, let me point out that it’s not easy to wear the stripes.

Take, for instance, the following scenario:

You’re working a college game, and player A1 is at the free throw line. The official administering a free throw has alerted players that the game shall resume, and the ball is placed at the disposal of A1, but team B is not occupying the respective legal first marked lane spaces. Team A requests a timeout. What do you do…WHAT DO YOU DO?


I’ll post the answer to this question in 24-48 hours. We’ll see how many of you get it right!

*One important disclaimer: Many of you know that I am a registered official. However, I’m not a spokesman for officials, and I’m not a rules interpreter. (There are people who actually specialize in that.) Therefore, there is no inside info being shared here. This is a scenario taken directly from the college basketball case book, which is available to the public.

UPDATE: Here’s your answer! “Once the ball is placed at the disposal of A1, an automatic delayed violation shall be called on Team B for not occupying the first marked lane space on each side. However, any player from Team A may request and be granted a timeout before the expiration of the 10-second time limit for shooting the free throw. However, the timeout shall not negate the violation by Team B.”
(Rule 8-1.5, 5-13.1.a and 9-2.2)

So if you picked the third and final option, you are correct.

If you picked the first or second option, I still think you are smart and charming.

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