Tressel Reaction Day Two

It’s been more than 24 hours since Jim Tressel resigned, and the reaction is still coming in. Plus, there’s been the development of Sports Illustrated releasing their investigative piece regarding the former Buckeye head man.

So it’s time for another round of commentary from around the sports world.


Los Angeles Times reporter Chris Dufresne:

“Jim Tressel’s resignation as Ohio State football coach on Memorial Day was sad for all the kids involved but sadder for all the grown-ups.

The first thing they tell you to do when you’re in a hole is stop digging.

Tressel, instead, grabbed the biggest shovel.

Hubris is part of the plague of being one of the most powerful people in town, as Tressel was in Columbus. Control freaks think they can control things. Control freaks with power think they can control everything…

No matter how powerful you are — or how much money you make — right is right and wrong is wrong.

It may take truth time, but, in the end, it always catches up.

Let that be a lesson to you kids.”

From Along The Olentangy, Kyle Lamb:

“[Tressel] was a man that is larger than life, yet always smaller than the company he kept.

However, as easy as it might be to characterize the man with effusive praise and note how difficult replacing him will ultimately be, it’s neither the time nor the place for such adoration or resignation to the eulogy of Ohio State football.

After all, as Tressel would be the first to say, the program is not about one individual or one coach. While the hurt and disappointment will resonate and linger for many months, the program will move forward. This too shall pass.”

Chicago Sun Times columnist Kyle Koster:

“There are no winners in this situation, except, perhaps, other Big Ten teams who now view a more wide-open conference race. The NCAA will continue digging and sanctions should be severe. A lot of honest athletes will suffer. A lot of dyed-in-the-wool fans will have their faith in the program frayed. The Ohio State University will always have The Scandal.

It’s very, very hard to defend a man who demanded his star players return to serve a five-game suspension while lying about his culpability in the matter. It’s hard to ignore the hypocrisy and over-run hubris. And it’s hard to believe that it all didn’t catch up to him sooner.”

From Detroit Free Press columnist Michael Rosenberg:

“Tressel’s legacy in Columbus will be complex. In Michigan, he’ll forever be a villain. In the winter of 2008, he persuaded quarterback Terrelle Pryor to choose OSU instead of U-M, and in retrospect, that hyped recruiting battle was even bigger than we thought. Pryor, one of the key players in the OSU scandal, may have brought down the coaches at Ohio State and Michigan. Instead of running Rich Rodriguez’s offense, he destroyed Rodriguez’s defense.

The Tressel saga also should make Michigan fans appreciate Lloyd Carr even more — the knocks on Carr were that anybody could win at Michigan and he couldn’t beat Tressel, and both of those knocks seem silly today. Knowing what you know now, would you rather have Carr as your coach or Tressel?

Tressel leaves with a 9-1 record against Michigan and a shattered reputation. He might not like that tradeoff today. But he’ll have to live with it for a long time.”

Also, the reaction of golf great Jack Nicklaus, Texas coach Mack Brown, Miami Heat doo doo head LeBron James, and the interesting thoughts of the father of a current Ohio State Buckeye. (If you read to the end of that last article, you’ll see he says, “I don’t think we have the whole story”).

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